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Ladies Home Journal, Sept. 1922, pg. 180

With the advent of a large consumer culture, advertisers of the 1920s maximized their potential market by inventing “a new kind of advertisement which appealed to the consumer’s subjective desires and fears as opposed to his or her rational judgments.”[1] This Dr. Denton Sleeping Garment marketing campaign evidenced this urge to mothers to reckon with their child’s health based on clothing. Ruth Cowan’s research supports this guilt-based business which enticed women to purchase their products. [2]

 

[1] Marilyn Ferris Motz and Pat Browne, eds., Making the American Home: Middle-Class Women & Domestic Material Culture 1840-1940 (Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1988), 41.

[2]Ruth Schwartz Cowan, “The ‘Industrial Revolution’ in the Home: Household Technology and Social Change in the Twentieth Century” in Technology and Culture 17 (1976) 489.

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