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Lightness of Being, 2004 — (C) Chris Levine courtesy Danziger Gallery

The Queen’s State and daily events integrate symbols of power and continuum. The physical crown “is a mnemonic device for some 600 years of British history.”[1] The coronation regalia acted as “sacra, a means of communicating gnosis, the wisdom essential to transform the Queen’s body natural into the body politic.”[2] By wearing emblematic items, The queen’s physical body holds the spiritual and political icons of authority.


[1] Ilse Hayden, Symbol and Privilege: The Ritual Context of British Royalty. (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1987), 32-33.

[2] Ibid., 151.

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