Aviation Queen

Beech King Air

Olive Ann Beech established an aviation business with her husband, Walter, in 1932. During the Depression, this dynamic duo created an airplane empire which would aid the American cause during World War II. She oversaw the business in 1940 due to her husband’s severe illness. Her tenacious behavior and business skills helped her manage the development of more than 7,200 aircraft throughout the war.

Olive Ann Beech

June Harrison and Olive Ann Beech pose by a Travel Air biplane

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Lightness of Being, 2004 — (C) Chris Levine courtesy Danziger Gallery

The Queen’s State and daily events integrate symbols of power and continuum. The physical crown “is a mnemonic device for some 600 years of British history.”[1] The coronation regalia acted as “sacra, a means of communicating gnosis, the wisdom essential to transform the Queen’s body natural into the body politic.”[2] By wearing emblematic items, The queen’s physical body holds the spiritual and political icons of authority.


[1] Ilse Hayden, Symbol and Privilege: The Ritual Context of British Royalty. (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1987), 32-33.

[2] Ibid., 151.

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